Tag Archives: PRESIDENT

“I SEE TROUBLE, PRESIDENT BUHARI MUST NOT DIE” – BISHOP ADEOYE

A Pentecostal Bishop, Rt. Rev. Seun Adeoye, has urged Nigerians to pray for the quick recovery of President Muhammadu Buhari, saying his wellbeing is so important to the nation’s co-existence and stability.

Bishop Adeoye warned that if anything should happen to President Buhari, such would be a difficult burden for the nation to bear as Nigeria will fall into wrong hands that are ready do anything to turn it into their private estates.

The cleric, who spoke during the 1st Episcopal Honours and Gallantry Awards held at the weekend at Sufficient Grace and Truth Ministry, Rehoboth Arena, Okinni, Osun State, noted that only God can sustain the President’s health.

He said: “I see trouble should anything go wrong with President Buhari. So, we need to pray for his quick recovery from this ailment. Buhari must not die; Buhari must live and that should be our prayers.

“If Buhari is not the president, we will be faced with more lies and propaganda where we are going to be made to call black white. Rule of law will turn to be rule of fear and democracy will be replaced by despotism, favoritism and god-fatherism.

“We cannot allow Nigeria to be in the hand of any of the present leaders. None of them can be the captain of this ship; they will run it aground with their arrogance and selfish agenda. They will rob, strip us Unclad and put us in perpetual bondage as slaves. So, I enjoin all of us to pray for the President Buhari to get well quickly.”

On those who were honoured, Bishop Adeoye disclosed that they were shortlisted from over 100 nominees and were screened by the church’s Council of Clergy based on their courage, service to humanity and God and their various contributions to the society.

Those on the successful list were the Commissioner of Police, Kwara State, Olusola Amore; his counterpart from Osun, Fimihan Adeoye; Prof. Ayo Fatubarin; Pastor and Prof. (Mrs) Olusegun Akinwusi; Dr. Kayode Oduoye; Barrister Kanmi Ajibola; Femi Adefila; Dr. and Mrs. Niyi Oginni; and Deacon and Deaconess Moses Ajayi.

Speaking on behalf of the awardees, Akinwusi, a former Head of Service in Osun State, urged Nigerians to pray fervently for the nation and not to keep mute or look the other way when things are going the wrong in the country.) 

PHOTOS OF PRESIDENT BUHAI ARRIVAL AT THE KADUNA AIRPORT

President Muhammadu Buhari is pictured disembarking from the Airforce 001 after arrival at the Kaduna aiport.
 
He was received by Deputy Governor Bantex, service chiefs and other dignitaries. The Nigerian Air Force 001 touched down at the Air Force Base in Kaduna, few minutes, ago before the President Buhari was airlifted in a chopper to Abuja.
 

See More Photos Below

The sources also revealed that the president might address the nation Friday after his long absence, in order to quell any concerns over his capacity to govern.

The news of his return Friday was broken last night in a statement by his media aide, Mr. Femi Adesina.

Adesina recalled that the president left the shores of the country on January 19 for a vacation, during which he was scheduled to undergo routine medical check-ups.

He said the scheduled vacation was however extended due to the advice by his doctors that he undergoes further medical tests.

According to him, the president expressed gratitude to the generality of Nigerians in all parts of the country and beyond who supported him in their prayers and good wishes while he was away.

“President Muhammadu Buhari is expected to return to the country tomorrow, Friday March 10, 2017. The President left the country on January 19, 2017 for a vacation, during which he had routine medical check-ups.

“The holiday was extended based on doctors’ recommendation for further tests and rest.

“President Buhari expresses appreciation to teeming Nigerians from across the country and beyond, who had prayed fervently for him and also sent their good wishes,” the statement said.

Earlier Thursday, the Archbishop of Canterbury, Rev. Justin Welby, had paid a visit to Buhari in Abuja House, London where the president had resided throughout his medical vacation.

The president, who announced Welby’s visit on his Facebook page, said he was pleased to receive the archbishop, whom he described as his friend.

“Very pleased to welcome my friend, the Most Rev. Hon. Justin Welby, the Archbishop of Canterbury,” the president had said.

Other than his doctors, Welby was possibly the first non-Nigerian citizen to visit the president in London since January 19 when he left the country.

Last month, the president was visited by numerous Nigerians including two leaders of the All Progressives Congress (APC), Senator Bola Tinubu and Chief Bisi Akande.

He had earlier been visited by the Governor of Ogun State, Senator Ibikunle Amosun, and Senator Daisy Danjuma.

He was also visited on February 23 by a National Assembly team led by Senate President Bukola Saraki. Also in the team was the Speaker of the House of Representatives, Hon. Yakubu Dogara, and the Senate Leader, Senator Ahmad Lawan.

The visit was made days after both Saraki and Dogara had disclosed that they had telephone conversations with Buhari.

While Saraki said he called Buhari, Dogara said the president had called him and discussed issues affecting the welfare of Nigerians with him.

The president left the country on January 19, 2017, four days earlier than scheduled, stating that he would return on February 6 to resume duty.

But on February 5, the presidency announced the extension of his vacation indefinitely, saying the president was waiting for the results of the medical tests and needed to be certified okay by his doctors before leaving London.

Since then, speculations have been rife over the president’s health.

Indeed, even before the presidency informed the public of the extension of Buhari’s vacation, there were rumours that he had died in the UK.

All these proved to be untrue after the presidency released proof of life photographs of the president and his visitors.

“BUHARI RETURNS TO NIGERIA ON FRIDAY” – SPECIAL ADVISER TO THE PRESIDENT, FEMI ADESINA

According to The Special Adviser to the President Femi Adesina Buhari will Return To Nigeria Tomorrow Friday 9th March 2017

PRESIDENT BUHARI EXPECTED BACK FRIDAY

President Muhammadu Buhari is expected to return to the country tomorrow, Friday March 10, 2017.

The President left the country on January 19, 2017 for a vacation, during which he had routine medical check-ups. The holiday was extended based on doctors’ recommendation for further tests and rest.

President Buhari expresses appreciation to teeming Nigerians from across the country, and beyond, who had prayed fervently for him, and also sent their good wishes.

FEMI ADESINA

Special Adviser to the President

(Media and Publicity)

March 9, 2017

BREAKING NEWS: ARCHBISHOP OF CANTERBURY VISITS PRESIDENT BUHARI IN LONDON

Buhari shaking hands with the iconic Christian leader

President Muhammadu Buhari has received the iconic Archbishop of Canterbury Most Reverend Justin Welby at the Abuja House in London on Thursday, March 9.

The President himself confirmed the meeting in a post on his social media pages on Thursday afternoon just after the meeting.

He wrote: “ Very pleased to welcome my friend the Most Revd and Rt Hon Justin Welby, Archbishop of Canterbury, to Abuja House this afternoon.”

Both men pose for a picture at the Abuja House in London where President Muhammadu Buhari is staying

Archbishop of Canterbury is the senior bishop and principal leader of the Church of England. He is also the symbolic head of the worldwide Anglican Communion and the diocesan bishop of the Diocese of Canterbury.

The visit comes just hours after the president called Nigeria to commiserate with former Ekiti state governor Niyi Adebayo on the death of his father.

The last publicized visit President Buhari got was from his daughter Hadiza. Before then, some political chieftains from the ruling All Progressives Congress also visited him.

PHOTOS: NIGERIANS STORM NIGERIA HIGH COMMISSION UK, DEMAND TO SEE PRESIDENT BUHARI

Some Nigerians in the UK are currently in front of the Nigerian High

Commission demanding that President Buhari comes out to address them.

President Buhari who was meant to return to Nigeria yesterday, has asked for legislative powers to extend his vacation indefinitely due to incomplete medical checkup.

“THERE WILL BE WAR IN NIGERIA IF BUHARI DIES AND OSINBAJO IS MADE PRESIDENT” – FULANI MAN

A Hausa/Fulani man and strong supporter of President Muhammadu Buhari has declared that there will be civil war and bloodshed in Nigeria if the president should die.

Haruna Maitala posted the warning on the Facebook page of a group known as Nigerian Civil Rights Movement, in the wake of the wicked rumour that has been making the rounds on the death of the president.

Maitala was unequivocal when he said that the Hausa/Fulani would never accept a situation where the Vice President, Yomi Osinbajo, would assume leadership of the country because power belongs to them and they are not ready to let it go.

The Jos, Plateau State-based Maitala added that in the event of Buhari’s death, anyone taking over must be of the Hausa/Fulani stock or there will be war in the country and that as long as the person is their brother, they will be satisfied.

This is what Maitala wrote:

“President Buhari is healthy and enjoying his time in UK. God forbid if Buhari is to die, Christians/Southerners should not celebrate because Osinbajo or any other Christian will not take power because this power belongs to the North (Hausa/Fulani) we will never agree to lost (he meant ‘lose’) power how we did in 2010.

If Osinbajo did not resign, then another civil war awaits Nigeria. Or Buratai should stage a coup. Or they should bring anyone else from the North (Hausa-Fulani) as far as our brother is in power we are satisfied. This should serve as a warning.”

With this mindset of Maitala and his likes, no one knows where Nigeria will be heading if anything should happen to the president.

PRESIDENT DONALD TRUMP TO BAN 2-YEAR ENTRY VISA FOR NIGERIANS

Except the federal government takes a proactive visa policy review, Nigerians will no longer be issued with American entry visas which have two-year validity following the Executive Order signed on Friday by President Donald Trump, TheCable can report.

Also, Nigerians who hold dual nationality will be affected if their other passport is from Syria, Iraq, Iran, Sudan, Libya, Somalia and Yemen — the seven Muslim-majority countries “of concern”.

A lot of attention has been on the temporary visa ban on citizens of the seven Muslim-majority countries, but the impact on Nigerians is far more than previously thought.

An analysis of the Executive Order by TheCable editors shows that at least two sections will affect Nigerians directly.

Nigeria currently only issues one-year multiple-entry visa to Americans, which is a non-reciprocation of the two-year visa the country issues to Nigerians.

Section 9 of the Executive Order states: “The Secretary of State shall review all nonimmigrant visa reciprocity agreements to ensure that they are, with respect to each visa classification, truly reciprocal insofar as practicable with respect to validity period and fees, as required by sections 221(c) and 281 of the INA, 8 U.S.C. 1201(c) and 1351, and other treatment. If a country does not treat United States nationals seeking nonimmigrant visas in a reciprocal manner, the Secretary of State shall adjust the visa validity period, fee schedule, or other treatment to match the treatment of United States nationals by the foreign country, to the extent practicable…”

By this provision, except the federal government quickly moves to extend the validity of Nigerian visa to Americans, Nigerians too will be issued with one-year visas.

Given that the Trump order takes immediate effect, Nigerians holding valid two-year US visa are most likely going to be affected.

Nigeria is also not reciprocating the fees charged by the American government — despite shorter visa validity.

While the US charges Nigerians $160 for a typical visit visa, Nigeria charges $180, in addition to a $35 “processing fee”.

The section on dual nationality involving seven Muslim-majority countries is not expected to affect a significant number of Nigerians because a second citizenship of Syria, Iraq, Iran, Sudan, Libya, Somalia and Yemen is not common.

Many Nigerians, including government officials, hold dual nationality with either the US or Europe.

However, Nigerians who have been to Syria, Iraq, Iran, Sudan, Libya, Somalia and Yemen in recent times may be subjected to extra immigration control with possible deportation.

THE EXECUTIVE ORDER IN FULL

PROTECTING THE NATION FROM FOREIGN TERRORIST ENTRY INTO THE UNITED STATES

By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and laws of the United States of America, including the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA), 8 U.S.C. 1101 et seq., and section 301 of title 3, United States Code, and to protect the American people from terrorist attacks by foreign nationals admitted to the United States, it is hereby ordered as follows:

Section 1. Purpose. The visa-issuance process plays a crucial role in detecting individuals with terrorist ties and stopping them from entering the United States. Perhaps in no instance was that more apparent than the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, when State Department policy prevented consular officers from properly scrutinizing the visa applications of several of the 19 foreign nationals who went on to murder nearly 3,000 Americans. And while the visa-issuance process was reviewed and amended after the September 11 attacks to better detect would-be terrorists from receiving visas, these measures did not stop attacks by foreign nationals who were admitted to the United States.

Numerous foreign-born individuals have been convicted or implicated in terrorism-related crimes since September 11, 2001, including foreign nationals who entered the United States after receiving visitor, student, or employment visas, or who entered through the United States refugee resettlement program. Deteriorating conditions in certain countries due to war, strife, disaster, and civil unrest increase the likelihood that terrorists will use any means possible to enter the United States. The United States must be vigilant during the visa-issuance process to ensure that those approved for admission do not intend to harm Americans and that they have no ties to terrorism.

In order to protect Americans, the United States must ensure that those admitted to this country do not bear hostile attitudes toward it and its founding principles. The United States cannot, and should not, admit those who do not support the Constitution, or those who would place violent ideologies over American law. In addition, the United States should not admit those who engage in acts of bigotry or hatred (including “honor” killings, other forms of violence against women, or the persecution of those who practice religions different from their own) or those who would oppress Americans of any race, gender, or sexual orientation.

Sec. 2. Policy. It is the policy of the United States to protect its citizens from foreign nationals who intend to commit terrorist attacks in the United States; and to prevent the admission of foreign nationals who intend to exploit United States immigration laws for malevolent purposes.

Sec. 3. Suspension of Issuance of Visas and Other Immigration Benefits to Nationals of Countries of Particular Concern. (a) The Secretary of Homeland Security, in consultation with the Secretary of State and the Director of National Intelligence, shall immediately conduct a review to determine the information needed from any country to adjudicate any visa, admission, or other benefit under the INA (adjudications) in order to determine that the individual seeking the benefit is who the individual claims to be and is not a security or public-safety threat.

(b) The Secretary of Homeland Security, in consultation with the Secretary of State and the Director of National Intelligence, shall submit to the President a report on the results of the review described in subsection (a) of this section, including the Secretary of Homeland Security’s determination of the information needed for adjudications and a list of countries that do not provide adequate information, within 30 days of the date of this order. The Secretary of Homeland Security shall provide a copy of the report to the Secretary of State and the Director of National Intelligence.

(c) To temporarily reduce investigative burdens on relevant agencies during the review period described in subsection (a) of this section, to ensure the proper review and maximum utilization of available resources for the screening of foreign nationals, and to ensure that adequate standards are established to prevent infiltration by foreign terrorists or criminals, pursuant to section 212(f) of the INA, 8 U.S.C. 1182(f), I hereby proclaim that the immigrant and nonimmigrant entry into the United States of aliens from countries referred to in section 217(a)(12) of the INA, 8 U.S.C. 1187(a)(12), would be detrimental to the interests of the United States, and I hereby suspend entry into the United States, as immigrants and nonimmigrants, of such persons for 90 days from the date of this order (excluding those foreign nationals traveling on diplomatic visas, North Atlantic Treaty Organization visas, C-2 visas for travel to the United Nations, and G-1, G-2, G-3, and G-4 visas).

(d) Immediately upon receipt of the report described in subsection (b) of this section regarding the information needed for adjudications, the Secretary of State shall request all foreign governments that do not supply such information to start providing such information regarding their nationals within 60 days of notification.

(e) After the 60-day period described in subsection (d) of this section expires, the Secretary of Homeland Security, in consultation with the Secretary of State, shall submit to the President a list of countries recommended for inclusion on a Presidential proclamation that would prohibit the entry of foreign nationals (excluding those foreign nationals traveling on diplomatic visas, North Atlantic Treaty Organization visas, C-2 visas for travel to the United Nations, and G-1, G-2, G-3, and G-4 visas) from countries that do not provide the information requested pursuant to subsection (d) of this section until compliance occurs.

(f) At any point after submitting the list described in subsection (e) of this section, the Secretary of State or the Secretary of Homeland Security may submit to the President the names of any additional countries recommended for similar treatment.

(g) Notwithstanding a suspension pursuant to subsection (c) of this section or pursuant to a Presidential proclamation described in subsection (e) of this section, the Secretaries of State and Homeland Security may, on a case-by-case basis, and when in the national interest, issue visas or other immigration benefits to nationals of countries for which visas and benefits are otherwise blocked.

(h) The Secretaries of State and Homeland Security shall submit to the President a joint report on the progress in implementing this order within 30 days of the date of this order, a second report within 60 days of the date of this order, a third report within 90 days of the date of this order, and a fourth report within 120 days of the date of this order.

Sec. 4. Implementing Uniform Screening Standards for All Immigration Programs.

(a) The Secretary of State, the Secretary of Homeland Security, the Director of National Intelligence, and the Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation shall implement a program, as part of the adjudication process for immigration benefits, to identify individuals seeking to enter the United States on a fraudulent basis with the intent to cause harm, or who are at risk of causing harm subsequent to their admission. This program will include the development of a uniform screening standard and procedure, such as in-person interviews; a database of identity documents proffered by applicants to ensure that duplicate documents are not used by multiple applicants; amended application forms that include questions aimed at identifying fraudulent answers and malicious intent; a mechanism to ensure that the applicant is who the applicant claims to be; a process to evaluate the applicant’s likelihood of becoming a positively contributing member of society and the applicant’s ability to make contributions to the national interest; and a mechanism to assess whether or not the applicant has the intent to commit criminal or terrorist acts after entering the United States.

(b) The Secretary of Homeland Security, in conjunction with the Secretary of State, the Director of National Intelligence, and the Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, shall submit to the President an initial report on the progress of this directive within 60 days of the date of this order, a second report within 100 days of the date of this order, and a third report within 200 days of the date of this order.

Sec. 5. Realignment of the U.S. Refugee Admissions Program for Fiscal Year 2017. (a) The Secretary of State shall suspend the U.S. Refugee Admissions Program (USRAP) for 120 days. During the 120-day period, the Secretary of State, in conjunction with the Secretary of Homeland Security and in consultation with the Director of National Intelligence, shall review the USRAP application and adjudication process to determine what additional procedures should be taken to ensure that those approved for refugee admission do not pose a threat to the security and welfare of the United States, and shall implement such additional procedures. Refugee applicants who are already in the USRAP process may be admitted upon the initiation and completion of these revised procedures. Upon the date that is 120 days after the date of this order, the Secretary of State shall resume USRAP admissions only for nationals of countries for which the Secretary of State, the Secretary of Homeland Security, and the Director of National Intelligence have jointly determined that such additional procedures are adequate to ensure the security and welfare of the United States.

(b) Upon the resumption of USRAP admissions, the Secretary of State, in consultation with the Secretary of Homeland Security, is further directed to make changes, to the extent permitted by law, to prioritize refugee claims made by individuals on the basis of religious-based persecution, provided that the religion of the individual is a minority religion in the individual’s country of nationality. Where necessary and appropriate, the Secretaries of State and Homeland Security shall recommend legislation to the President that would assist with such prioritization.

(c) Pursuant to section 212(f) of the INA, 8 U.S.C. 1182(f), I hereby proclaim that the entry of nationals of Syria as refugees is detrimental to the interests of the United States and thus suspend any such entry until such time as I have determined that sufficient changes have been made to the USRAP to ensure that admission of Syrian refugees is consistent with the national interest.

(d) Pursuant to section 212(f) of the INA, 8 U.S.C. 1182(f), I hereby proclaim that the entry of more than 50,000 refugees in fiscal year 2017 would be detrimental to the interests of the United States, and thus suspend any such entry until such time as I determine that additional admissions would be in the national interest.

(e) Notwithstanding the temporary suspension imposed pursuant to subsection (a) of this section, the Secretaries of State and Homeland Security may jointly determine to admit individuals to the United States as refugees on a case-by-case basis, in their discretion, but only so long as they determine that the admission of such individuals as refugees is in the national interest — including when the person is a religious minority in his country of nationality facing religious persecution, when admitting the person would enable the United States to conform its conduct to a preexisting international agreement, or when the person is already in transit and denying admission would cause undue hardship — and it would not pose a risk to the security or welfare of the United States.

(f) The Secretary of State shall submit to the President an initial report on the progress of the directive in subsection (b) of this section regarding prioritization of claims made by individuals on the basis of religious-based persecution within 100 days of the date of this order and shall submit a second report within 200 days of the date of this order.

(g) It is the policy of the executive branch that, to the extent permitted by law and as practicable, State and local jurisdictions be granted a role in the process of determining the placement or settlement in their jurisdictions of aliens eligible to be admitted to the United States as refugees. To that end, the Secretary of Homeland Security shall examine existing law to determine the extent to which, consistent with applicable law, State and local jurisdictions may have greater involvement in the process of determining the placement or resettlement of refugees in their jurisdictions, and shall devise a proposal to lawfully promote such involvement.

Sec. 6. Rescission of Exercise of Authority Relating to the Terrorism Grounds of Inadmissibility. The Secretaries of State and Homeland Security shall, in consultation with the Attorney General, consider rescinding the exercises of authority in section 212 of the INA, 8 U.S.C. 1182, relating to the terrorism grounds of inadmissibility, as well as any related implementing memoranda.

Sec. 7. Expedited Completion of the Biometric Entry-Exit Tracking System. (a) The Secretary of Homeland Security shall expedite the completion and implementation of a biometric entry-exit tracking system for all travelers to the United States, as recommended by the National Commission on Terrorist Attacks Upon the United States.

(b) The Secretary of Homeland Security shall submit to the President periodic reports on the progress of the directive contained in subsection (a) of this section. The initial report shall be submitted within 100 days of the date of this order, a second report shall be submitted within 200 days of the date of this order, and a third report shall be submitted within 365 days of the date of this order. Further, the Secretary shall submit a report every 180 days thereafter until the system is fully deployed and operational.

Sec. 8. Visa Interview Security. (a) The Secretary of State shall immediately suspend the Visa Interview Waiver Program and ensure compliance with section 222 of the INA, 8 U.S.C. 1222, which requires that all individuals seeking a nonimmigrant visa undergo an in-person interview, subject to specific statutory exceptions.

(b) To the extent permitted by law and subject to the availability of appropriations, the Secretary of State shall immediately expand the Consular Fellows Program, including by substantially increasing the number of Fellows, lengthening or making permanent the period of service, and making language training at the Foreign Service Institute available to Fellows for assignment to posts outside of their area of core linguistic ability, to ensure that non-immigrant visa-interview wait times are not unduly affected.

Sec. 9. Visa Validity Reciprocity. The Secretary of State shall review all nonimmigrant visa reciprocity agreements to ensure that they are, with respect to each visa classification, truly reciprocal insofar as practicable with respect to validity period and fees, as required by sections 221(c) and 281 of the INA, 8 U.S.C. 1201(c) and 1351, and other treatment. If a country does not treat United States nationals seeking nonimmigrant visas in a reciprocal manner, the Secretary of State shall adjust the visa validity period, fee schedule, or other treatment to match the treatment of United States nationals by the foreign country, to the extent practicable.

Sec. 10. Transparency and Data Collection. (a) To be more transparent with the American people, and to more effectively implement policies and practices that serve the national interest, the Secretary of Homeland Security, in consultation with the Attorney General, shall, consistent with applicable law and national security, collect and make publicly available within 180 days, and every 180 days thereafter:

(i) information regarding the number of foreign nationals in the United States who have been charged with terrorism-related offenses while in the United States; convicted of terrorism-related offenses while in the United States; or removed from the United States based on terrorism-related activity, affiliation, or material support to a terrorism-related organization, or any other national security reasons since the date of this order or the last reporting period, whichever is later;

(ii) information regarding the number of foreign nationals in the United States who have been radicalized after entry into the United States and engaged in terrorism-related acts, or who have provided material support to terrorism-related organizations in countries that pose a threat to the United States, since the date of this order or the last reporting period, whichever is later; and

(iii) information regarding the number and types of acts of gender-based violence against women, including honor killings, in the United States by foreign nationals, since the date of this order or the last reporting period, whichever is later; and

(iv) any other information relevant to public safety and security as determined by the Secretary of Homeland Security and the Attorney General, including information on the immigration status of foreign nationals charged with major offenses.

(b) The Secretary of State shall, within one year of the date of this order, provide a report on the estimated long-term costs of the USRAP at the Federal, State, and local levels.

Sec. 11. General Provisions. (a) Nothing in this order shall be construed to impair or otherwise affect:

(i) the authority granted by law to an executive department or agency, or the head thereof; or

(ii) the functions of the Director of the Office of Management and Budget relating to budgetary, administrative, or legislative proposals.

(b) This order shall be implemented consistent with applicable law and subject to the availability of appropriations.

(c) This order is not intended to, and does not, create any right or benefit, substantive or procedural, enforceable at law or in equity by any party against the United States, its departments, agencies, or entities, its officers, employees, or agents, or any other person.

DONALD J. TRUMP

THE WHITE HOUSE, January 27, 2017

1 DOWN 7 MORE TO GO: SEE LIST OF AFRICA’S 7 CURRENT LONGEST-SERVING PRESIDENTS (MUST SEE)

The past two weeks have placed the African continent on the world map for the wrong reasons. Ex- Gambian President Yahya Jammeh held on to power forcing the newly elected Adama Barrow to be sworn in at the Gambian embassy in Senegal.

He has been in power for more than 22 years, but other current African leaders have ruled longer. Below is a list of Seven other African leaders who have led for more than 30 years…

Robert Mugabe (Zimbabwe) — 36 years

Age: 92

In power since: April 1980, when his country gained independence after he coordinated a guerrilla war against white colonial rulers. He first was prime minister, then took the presidency in 1987 — elected by the national assembly — when a new constitution created the office to replace the prime minister’s office.

Current election rules: Five-year terms, no term limits. He has claimed victory in popular votes — sometimes highly controversially — in 1990, 1996, 2002, 2008, and 2013. He is the last living African leader who’s been in power continuously since his country’s independence.

King Mswati III (Swaziland) — 30 years

Age: 48

In power since: April 1986, upon turning 18, nearly four years after the death of his father, the previous king.

No popular election for the king : Swaziland is Africa’s last remaining absolute monarchy, which is hereditary. The country has an elected Parliament, and Mswati chooses a prime minster from among the elected members.

Teodoro Obiang Nguema Mbasogo (Equatorial Guinea) — 37 years

Age: 74

In power since: August 3, 1979, when he toppled his uncle in a military coup.

Current election rules: The president is elected in a majority popular vote for seven-year terms. This leader last claimed victory in an April 2016 election, reportedly with 93.7% of the vote. Opposition members and human rights groups have questioned the elections’ fairness.

Denis Sassou-Nguesso (Republic of Congo) — 33 years, nonconsecutive

Age: 73

In power since: It’s complicated. He first was president from 1979 to 1992, when he was defeated in an election. He returned to power in 1997 during a civil war, eventually standing for and winning a presidential election in 2002.

Current election rules: Majority popular vote. Up to three five-year terms, though a 2015 constitutional referendum allowed Sassou-Nguesso to forgo the limits, according to Freedom House, a US nonprofit that promotes democracy. The last election was in March 2016.

Yoweri Museveni (Uganda) — 31 years

Age: 72

In power since: January 1986, when Museveni, a guerrilla leader and former defense minister, ousted a military regime.

Current election rules: Majority popular vote for five-year terms, with no term limits. Museveni held the presidency for 10 years before he was chosen in the country’s first direct presidential election in 1996. After his re-election in 2001, Parliament removed presidential term limits in 2005. He was elected for a fifth term in February 2016.

Paul Biya (Cameroon) — 34 years

Age: 83

In power since: November 1982, when the then-prime minister succeeded a president who resigned.

Current election rules: Majority popular vote for seven-year terms. Last elected in October 2012. No term limits.

Jose Eduardo dos Santos (Angola) — 37 years

Age: 74

In power since: September 1979, when he was elected the ruling party’s leader upon the previous president’s death.

Current election rules: Under terms of a constitution approved in 2010, the leader of the party that wins a popular parliamentary vote is president for five years. Dos Santos’ party won elections in 2012, so under the new rules, he started the first of a possible two terms. The election was Angola’s third since it gained independence from Portugal in 1975, as it was often wracked by civil war.

Additional Information from: CNN